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How they do the voodoo that they do so well – Part 2

Posted in Photon in the Darkness by Skepdude on September 22, 2008

End Games:

Eventually, even the most successful, charismatic “alternative” practitioner will have a patient who doesn’t improve enough to satisfy the parents. Not only are these parents a real drag on the “alternative” practitioner’s ego, there is the very real chance that they might start to talk about how “the Emperor has no clothes”. For those situations, there are a number of strategies that are typically used.

Did you follow my instructions to the letter?:

One of the oldest dodges in the “alternative” medicine “biz” is to prescribe a regimen of treatment that is too complicated for most patients to follow. If they get better (by chance), then it was due to the “treatment” – if they don’t get better….well, they didn’t follow all of the instructions exactly, did they?

Much the same is happening in “alternative” autism therapy. One of the first chelation regimens promoted for treating autism required that the parents give their children a dose every four hours around the clock for two weeks. This meant waking the child up in the middle of the night – every night – for two weeks and getting them to drink a foul-smelling liquid.

The parents were cautioned that missing a single dose – or being late by more than two hours – meant risking having more mercury deposited in the brain. This – needless to say – was absolute nonsense. But no parent who failed to see the promised results could honestly say that they had given every dose on time.

READ THE REST OF THIS ENTRY AT “A PHOTON IN THE DARKNESS”

How they do the voodoo that they do so well – Part 1

Posted in Photon in the Darkness by Skepdude on September 22, 2008

You’ve probably heard the story. A child is diagnosed with autism and the desperate (yes, I said “desperate”) parents search for answers. The “mainstream” doctors tell them that there is little that they can do (note: ”mainstream” doctors almost never say, “There’s nothing that can be done.”). Not satisfied with that answer (and what parent would be satisfied?), the parents try “alternative” practitioners.

And sure enough, the “alternative” practitioner has just the answers the parents are looking for. He or she can help them “recover” their child.

Or can they?

Over the years, I’ve shown how many of the “therapies” that claim to “cure” or “recover” autistic children haven’t been shown to work. But how do the practitioners keep the parents “on the hook”, even when the treatments aren’t working? That’s the topic of today’s lecture.

Before I get started, I need to make one thing perfectly clear. Despite being a hard-bitten cynic, I am convinced that most of the “alternative” practitioners truly believe that what they are doing is helping their patients. There are, of course, a minority that are consciously trying to deceive their patients (or their parents), but I believe that the majority are convinced that their treatments actually work.

Once again, being honest is no protection against being wrong.

So, with that disclaimer, what are some of the techniques that the “alternative” practitioners use to keep parents satisfied even when the treatments don’t work?

[Note: the same techniques are used by most “alternative” practitioners, but I will approach them from the perspective of the parents of an autistic child.]

READ THE REST OF THIS ENTRY AT “A PHOTON IN THE DARKNESS”