Skepfeeds-The Best Skeptical blogs of the day

Ghost Repeller Now Available

Posted in JREF, Skepdude by Skepdude on March 19, 2009

While some may be “hunting” ghosts, or merely trying to decide whether they exist or not, one ambitious Thai company, Boondee Laboratories, has created a device that will force them away. They claim it works on devils too.

First, I have to comment on the language on the site. The authors are clearly not native English speakers, and as easy as it would be to poke fun at their phrasing and word choice, I’m going to refrain from doing so for one simple reason: I can’t speak a word of Thai that isn’t on a restaurant menu (I’m a big fan of Tom Kha Gai).

This electronic device sends out a “killer wave” that’s supposed to repel ghosts. From Boondee:

Video capture the invisible picture then convert to radio signal and sent to WAVE KILLER gernerated by complex electronic circuit.

READ THE REST OF THIS STORY AT “RANDI.ORG”

Killer Wave! KILLER WAVE..AAAAHHH! But the real money quote is in the FAQ’s if you ask me. Check this out:

  • What about my house has a good spirit of our ancestor protect my family, would this machine kill their spirit ?
      Ans. The machine can distinguist the phenomenon signal input, good spirit and bad spirit has its characteristic, the device will ignor or skip the good spirit.
  • What happen if we unplug the machine at later time, how can we sure the ghost won’t come back again with more angry ?
    • Ans. The machine is smart than ghost, fear and not return. You did not battle with ghost, the machine fight with ghost for you.

    Ha ha….ha ha  ha ha! I can’t believe they want to sell that cheap looking piece of crap!

    Lose Weight – With Lasers

    Posted in The Rogues Gallery by Skepdude on March 9, 2009

    Listener, Nick,  sent in the following e-mail:

    For a couple of years now, I’ve been trying to lose weight the old fashioned way. Eat less, move more. Today my personal trainer suggested this weight loss clinic that uses some foam wrapping and infrared lasers. My trainer said she’d tried it and it works and gave me the web site. I’m looking over the website and I’m not buying it. But I’m not that good of a skeptic and don’t know why I’m not buying it. I just know, I’m not buying it. Would the skeptics be so kind as to tell me why this doesn’t work? Thanks, and I love the show.

    http://www.achievelaser.com/weight-loss.html

    Wow. This is one of those websites that just overwhelms you with pseudoscientific technobabble. There is far too much nonsense here to tackle in a single blog, so I am going to focus on two claims – the low level laser therapy (LLLT) and the infrared body wrap.

    But first, for a little background, it’s interesting to note that spas have had a tradition for literally hundreds of years of promoting wellness (that is, there own financial wellnes) through pure BS. The basic marketing strategy is to convince people with disposable income and too sedentary a lifestyle to come in, relax, and passively receive exotic treatments that will cure whatever ails them. Spas have often been on the cutting edge of health pseudoscience. Today they incorporate the latest fads in CAM – from aromatherapy to reflexology.

    The infrared bodywrap is in the sweet-spot of the spa tradition – and now you can enjoy the same exploitation at home. The basic claim here is that the wrap system contains infrared radiation, which penetrates the skins and (you know the drill) – removes toxins, increases blood flow and oxygen delivery, and melts away fat and cellulite. Right.It promises you will lose weight and inches.

    Of course, all such wraps do make you lose weight and inches – by dehydration via sweating. That’s the core trick here. Of course, water loss is not fat loss and in fact is counterproductive. But it is highly profitable.

    READ THE REST OF THIS ENTRY AT “THE ROGUES GALLERY”

    Skepnews – 8/15/08

    Posted in Skepnews by Skepdude on August 15, 2008

    • Australian priest charged with sexual assault – The 65-year-old clergyman was arrested Thursday. He is accused of assaulting 18 boys between the ages of 11 and 17 during the 1970s and ’80s while he served as the priest at a church in Newcastle, 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of Sydney.
    • Yet another age reversing device, this one for your face What it claims to do: The manufacturer, Hanna Ibes, Inc., says the Flex-Away facial exerciser gives the face and neck muscles the “workout they need to stay fit and healthy.” It promises users will see their “down-turned lips become rounded and lifted, giving the entire face a younger appearance” and “lower cheeks appear hollower for a classic sculptured look. What the experts say: Dr. Anthony Youn, a Michigan-based, board-certified plastic surgeon and msnbc.com contributor, says I shouldn’t feel bad about that my Flex-Away didn’t revitalize my aging face. There’s never been a study that’s shown that flexing the muscles does anything,” he says.
    • Hunters claim to have found Bigfoot – Named Rickmat in honour of Rick Dyer and Matthew Whitton, Bigfoot hunters who claim to have bagged the 500lb ’corpse’ during an expedition in the US state of Georgia, it was being hailed today as potentially the “greatest discovery of the millennium” – by its finders, at least. Photographs of Rickmat lying crumpled and apparently decapitated in a chest freezer drew so many visitors to one website today that it crashed under the pressure. But Dyer and Whitton’s own website – bigfoottracker.com – appeared well prepared for the onslaught, advertising opportunities for the public to take guided tours in the footsteps of Rickmat for $499 a time, and selling T-Shirts declaring: “Bigfoot for President.” “We have located a family of Bigfoot and besides the clear photo and video we have something even more shocking, A BODY. Please bear with us at this time. We have hired legal help. History is in the making,” they stated on their site. Ben Radford, managing editor for Skeptical Inquirer magazine, said: “It’s smelling to high heaven like a hoax.”
    • Judge led prayer in court – An Alabama judge who once wore the Ten Commandments embroidered on his robe has been accused of violating judicial ethics for ordering a group in his courtroom to hold hands and pray. The ACLU complaint said McKathan dropped to his knees and prayed aloud during a court hearing in February. He told the 100 people in the courtroom that he was not afraid to call on the name of Jesus Christ, witnesses said, and ordered all to join hands and pray, according to the complaint filed soon after the hearing. In response to the complaint, McKathan told the Mobile Press-Register for a story Thursday: “Whatever comes of all that, I’ll continue to have peace.” Quoting Romans in the King James version of the Bible, the judge added: “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them that are called according to his purpose.”