Skepfeeds-The Best Skeptical blogs of the day

Que She: The miracle diet pill that wasn’t

Posted in Skepdude by Skepdude on July 8, 2010

This Pill Will Revolutionize Weight Loss!” gushed a supporter about a year ago! This is revoutionary, it’s miraculous, it’s all natural, has no side effects blah blah blah, here read for yourself:

It is a combination of 11 Chinese herbs that can help you lose weight. These herbs work together to help increase your metabolism and increase energy. This revolutionary supplement is not a stimulant or an appetite suppressant, and it does not leave you feeling wired or hungry. It simply helps your body perform at an optimized digesting level. This product is all natural and made from common Chinese herbs; it will not cause you to lose your appetite it will only allow your body to use the food you intake more efficiently.

I have read many testimonials about this product and it gets rave reviews. Everyone I have spoken to that has tried this product has gotten great results from it. I have not heard reports of nasty side effects. Some weight loss pills leave you feeling jittery, or they may have a serious crash if you stop taking them, but Que She does not have these effects. This weight loss pill actually helps you control thoughts of eating, and users report that they still get hungry, but it is not in a compulsive manner; they get hungry when they actually are hungry. Que She may be the herbal supplement dieters have been looking for all these years.

It may…except that it isn’t. A recent FDA report warns users to stop using it immediately.

FDA Public Health Alert: Que She Weight Loss Capsules Contain Potentially Harmful Ingredients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today warned that Que She, marketed as an herbal weight loss supplement, contains active pharmaceutical ingredients not listed on the product label that could harm consumers, especially those with cardiovascular conditions.

People who have purchased Que She should stop taking the product immediately and consult a health care professional.

Wait a minute, this is all natural! There’s no way it contains anything “chemical”!

An FDA analysis of Que She found that it contains:

  • fenfluraminea stimulant drug withdrawn from the U.S. market in 1997 after studies demonstrated that it caused serious heart valve damage
  • propranolol – a prescription beta blocker drug that can pose a risk to people with bronchial asthma and certain heart conditions
  • sibutramine – a controlled substance and prescription weight loss drug, sibutramine was the subject of a recent study whose preliminary findings showed an association between sibutramine use and increased risk of heart attack and stroke in patients who have a history of heart disease
  • ephedrinea stimulant drug that is legally marketed over-the-counter for temporary relief of asthma but can pose a risk to people with certain cardiovascular conditions.

These active pharmaceutical ingredients also may interact with other medications and result in a serious adverse event.

Woops!

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Herbal remedies for arthritis mostly ineffective, says study

Posted in News by Skepdude on February 10, 2009

Many herbal medicines and other complementary therapies do nothing to help people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to a report published today.

A review of published data on natural remedies found the majority were completely ineffective at relieving patients’ symptoms, or had only tentative evidence to suggest they worked.

Almost half of the UK population tries complementary medicine at some point in their lives, and more than £450m a year is spent on herbal remedies, homeopathy, osteopathy, acupuncture and similar treatments. Among people with arthritis and similar conditions, the figure is nearer 60%, doctors said.

In the report, compiled by the charity Arthritis Research Campaign, doctors reviewed medical research on more than 50 remedies sold as treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia, a condition that causes pain in the muscles and connective tissues.

Each therapy was ranked from one to five, with one indicating the treatment has no effect, and five meaning there is good evidence that it works. Only fish oil, which is sold for rheumatoid arthritis, received the top ranking of five, while 17 of the remaining 20 treatments were deemed completely ineffective or had too little evidence to support their efficacy. Among them were extracts of elk antler velvet and green-lipped mussels.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE AT “THE GUARDIAN”

Alt med galore!

Posted in Skepdude by Skepdude on January 23, 2009

Did you know that sales of herbal formulas for cleansing, detoxification and organ support among natural food retailers were more than $27 million from Dec. 2, 2007, to Nov. 29, 2008 and that 54 food and drink products were launched in 2008 with the word “detox” in their descriptions — up from 15 in 2003? Why is that you ask?

“Western medicine is treating the symptoms instead of addressing the root cause,” said Edward F. Group III, a Houston-based naturopath with theholisticoption.com, an online resource for the alternative wellness community. “We basically have a world that’s constipated. It’s like if you change your oil in your car but never change the oil filter. Ultimately it gets so full of sludge the engine’s going to break down.”

Holy shit! Treat the root cause…fucking genius! I wonder what these geniuses think transplants are! Symptom treatments?

In fact this holistic approach is so, well inclusive, that this one stumbled across it… on her massage parlor:

I saw this first-hand in my massage practice when a client came in complaining of neck pain. As I began the massage I followed a line of tension all the way down the back, to the hips. Later I found increased muscle tension and decreased range of motion in the muscles of the leg as well. As I began to work this myofascial restriction the client mentioned, “Oh yeah – I hurt my knee 6 months ago, I forgot to tell you.” Even though it didn’t seem related to the client, the pattern of compensation set up in the body because of the knee injury, caused an imbalance in the body. The client felt the pain in the neck, but the root of the problem began in the leg.

Get it? Treat the cause not just the symptom. This guy bumped his knee and he got a stiff neck. 6 MONTHS LATER! That’s just amazing biologically speaking…amazing! I’m sure no modern, close-minded, cynical, western educated doctor could have helped him. No sir, you need a masseuse for this kind of shit, nothing less will do!

And you’d better look for this sort of help because, aparently “the American medical establishment crumbles around us — dying from its own greed, government neglect, a corrupt insurance system, and the disgusting excesses of the pharmaceutical industry“. Run for your life! Oh, sweet sounds of neck crackig chiropractors where art thou?

And let’s not let the western alternative medicine practitioners get all the credit. Let us not forget that fabulous Indian treasure, Ayurveda. Did you know it is to be credited for George Clooney’s and Madonna’s good looks? And also, the French President’s secret of stamina at this age is the special secret massages by alternative medicine expert Jean-Paul Moureau! Oui, oui! And why not, after all:

Ayurvedic massages just don’t end at skin care or relaxation. It is aimed at holistic well-being: meeting your physical, spiritual and emotional needs. During a massage session, the specialised masseuse transforms positive energy into the body thereby creating a feel good factor.” It’s about the environment in the spa — the oils used, the background music and the traditional techniques — that do wonders to one’s health.

The wonder…THE WONDER! I’m wonder-ified, aren’t you? And you didn’t think I’d leave without a tip of the heat to good ol’ Christianity now did you?

Much of alternative medicine has sound biblical applications in health and healing of disease. We need more representation in Christendom for this powerful healing system, which is predominately embraced by other belief systems.

In my experience as a Christian physician, I have seen fellow believers embrace teachings like this and accept some very clear pagan practices and count them as being permissible in Christian experience. I am not sure if they read the same Bible as I do, but I get clear instruction from the Scripture that pagan practices break the very first command that God gave to humankind, “You shall have no other gods before me” (Exodus 20:3).

I wonder if this guy puts up a tree for Christmas? Can someone inform him that this is a pagan practice, lest he end up glorifying a God other than the real one that is?

Oh and one last thing, if you’re supposed to be on a low iodine diet as treatment for thyroid cancer, you may want to steer clear of supplements. My favorite words from that article: Voodoo Medicine! Precious words for sure!